Diabetes

 

Diabetes is a disease where your body cannot control its blood sugar levels properly – either because your body doesn’t make enough (or any) insulin, or because your cells have become resistant to insulin.

Insulin is a chemical produced in the pancreas. It helps your body process sugars.

  • If blood sugar levels aren’t kept under control, diabetes can be life-threatening.
  • Diabetes can lead to other health conditions, including kidney failure, eye disease, foot ulceration and a higher risk of heart disease.
  • Keeping your blood sugar at a safe level means you’re less likely to have other health problems.

There’s no cure for diabetes, but there are things you can do to stay well. Support from your friends, health care providers can help.

Type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is when your body has stopped producing insulin. People with type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live.

  • Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children.
  • Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is when your cells have become insulin resistant or your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to keep you healthy.

  • Type 2 diabetes usually develops in adults but it is becoming more common in children.
  • Type 2 diabetes is the only type of diabetes linked with obesity.

Diabetes in pregnancy

Pregnant women can also develop diabetes. This is known as gestational diabetes (or ‘diabetes in pregnancy’). It usually goes away when the baby is born.

 

© RMI Ministry of Health and Human services

Search